The page cannot be displayed

There is a problem with the page you are looking for, and it cannot be displayed.

Please try the following:

  • Contact us using this form and let us know that an error has occurred for this URL address. If using the online form, put please tell us where the error occurred or what you were attempting to do. Copying and pasting the URL of the page may be helpful.
HTTP Error - Internal server error.
Internet Information Services (IIS)
System Error

The page cannot be displayed

There is a problem with the page you are looking for, and it cannot be displayed.

Please try the following:

  • Contact us using this form and let us know that an error has occurred for this URL address. If using the online form, put please tell us where the error occurred or what you were attempting to do. Copying and pasting the URL of the page may be helpful.
HTTP Error - Internal server error.
Internet Information Services (IIS)

Radical prostatectomy - discharge

Alternate Names

Prostatectomy - radical - discharge; Radical retropubic prostatectomy - discharge; Radical perineal prostatectomy - discharge; Laparoscopic radical prostatectomy - discharge; LRP - discharge; Robotic-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy - discharge ; RALP - discharge; Pelvic lymphadenectomy - discharge

When You Were in the Hospital

You had surgery to remove all of your prostate, some tissue near your prostate, and probably some lymph nodes. This was done to treat prostate cancer.

What Expect at Home

You may be tired and need more rest for 3 to 4 weeks after you go home. You may have pain or discomfort in your belly or the area between your scrotum and anus for 2 to 3 weeks.

You will go home with a catheter (tube) to drain urine from your bladder. This will be removed after 1 to 3 weeks.

Wound Care

Change the dressing over your surgical wound once a day, or sooner if it becomes soiled. Your doctor will tell you when you do not need to keep your wound covered. Keep the wound area clean by washing it with mild soap and water.

Your scrotum may be swollen for 2 to 3 weeks. You may need to wear either a support or brief underwear until the swelling goes away. While you are in bed, you may use a towel below your scrotum for support.

You may have a drain (called a Jackson-Pratt, or JP drain) below your belly button that helps extra fluid leak from your body. Your doctor will take it out after 1 to 3 days.

Urinary Catheters

While you have a urinary catheter:

After your catheter is removed:

Other Self-care

Do NOT drive the first 3 weeks after you come home. Avoid long car trips if you can. If you need to take a long car trip, stop at least every 2 hours.

Do NOT lift anything heavier than a 1-gallon milk jug for the first 6 weeks. You can slowly work back up to your normal exercise routine after that. You can do everyday activities around the house if you feel up to it. But expect to get tired more easily.

Drink at least 8 glasses of water a day, eat a lot of fruits and vegetables, and take stool softeners to prevent constipation. Do NOT strain during bowel movements.

Do NOT take aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), or other similar medicines for 2 weeks after your surgery. They may cause problems with blood clots.

Sexual Problems after Surgery

Sexual problems you may notice are:

These problems may get better or even go away, but it may take many months or more than a year. The lack of an ejaculate (semen coming out with orgasm) will be permanent. Ask your doctor about medicines that will help.

When to Call the Doctor

Call your doctor or nurse if:

While you have a urinary catheter, call your doctor if:

References

Smith JA, Su L. Laparoscopic and robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy. In: Wein AJ, ed. Campbell-Walsh Urology. 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Saunders Elsevier; 2011:chap 103.

Schaeffer EM, Partin AW, Lepor H.  Radical retropubic and perineal prostatectomy. In: Wein AJ, ed. Campbell-Walsh Urology. 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Saunders Elsevier; 2011:chap 102.


Review Date: 5/22/2013
Reviewed By: Louis S. Liou, MD, PhD, Chief of Urology, Cambridge Health Alliance, Visiting Assistant Professor of Surgery, Harvard Medical School. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Bethanne Black, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.
The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
adam.com
 
System Error

The page cannot be displayed

There is a problem with the page you are looking for, and it cannot be displayed.

Please try the following:

  • Contact us using this form and let us know that an error has occurred for this URL address. If using the online form, put please tell us where the error occurred or what you were attempting to do. Copying and pasting the URL of the page may be helpful.
HTTP Error - Internal server error.
Internet Information Services (IIS)