Grief Seminars

2015 Spring Grief Seminar

Grief Seminars

Dementia

Definition

Dementia is a loss of brain function that occurs with certain diseases. It affects memory, thinking, language, judgment, and behavior.

Alternative Names

Chronic brain syndrome; Lewy body dementia; DLB; Vascular dementia; Mild cognitive impairment; MCI

Causes

Dementia usually occurs in older age. It is rare in people under age 60. The risk of dementia increases as a person gets older.

Most types of dementia are nonreversible (degenerative). Nonreversible means the changes in the brain that are causing the dementia cannot be stopped or turned back. Alzheimer disease is the most common type of dementia.

Another common type of dementia is vascular dementia. It is caused by many small strokes.

Lewy body disease is a common cause of dementia in the elderly. People with this condition have abnormal protein structures in certain areas of the brain.

The following medical conditions can also lead to dementia:

Some causes of dementia may be stopped or reversed if they are found soon enough, including:

Symptoms

Dementia symptoms include difficulty with many areas of mental function, including:

Dementia usually first appears as forgetfulness.

Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is the stage between normal forgetfulness due to aging and the development of dementia. People with MCI have mild problems with thinking and memory that do not interfere with daily activities. They often know about their forgetfulness. Not everyone with MCI develops dementia.

Symptoms of MCI include:

Early symptoms of dementia can include:

As dementia becomes worse, symptoms are more obvious and interfere with the ability to take care of oneself. Symptoms may include:

People with severe dementia can no longer:

Other symptoms that may occur with dementia:

Exams and Tests

A skilled health care provider can often diagnose dementia using the following:

Other tests may be ordered to find out if other problems may be causing dementia or making it worse. These conditions include:

The following tests and procedures may be done:

Treatment

Treatment depends on the condition causing the dementia. Some people may need to stay in the hospital for a short time.

Sometimes dementia medicine can make a patient's confusion worse. Stopping or changing these medicines is part of the treatment.

Certain mental exercises can help with dementia.

Treating conditions that can lead to confusion often greatly improve mental function. Such conditions include:

Medicines may be used to:

Outlook (Prognosis)

People with mild cognitive impairment do not always develop dementia. When dementia does occur, it usually gets worse over time. Often it decreases quality of life and lifespan. Families will likely need to plan for their loved one’s future care.

.

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Call your health care provider if:

Prevention

Most causes of dementia are not preventable.

The risk of vascular dementia may be reduced by preventing strokes through:

References

Apostolova LG, DeKosky ST, Cummings JL. Dementias. In: Daroff RB, Fenichel GM, Jankovic J, Mazziotta JC, eds. Bradley's Neurology in Clinical Practice. 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap 66.

Bayer A. Presentation and clinical management of dementia. In: Fillit HM, Rockwood K, Woodhouse K, eds. Brocklehurst's Textbook of Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology. 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA; 2010:chap 52.

Camicioli R, Rockwood K. Dementia diagnosis. In: Fillit HM, Rockwood K, Woodhouse K, eds. Brocklehurst's Textbook of Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology. 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA; 2010:chap 51.

Knopman DS. Alzheimer's disease and other dementias. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine. 24th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 409.

Qaseem A, Snow V, Cross JT, et al., American College of Physicians/American Academy of Family Physicians Panel on Dementia. Current pharmacologic treatment of dementia: a clinical practice guideline from the American College of Physicians and the American Academy of Family Physicians. Ann Intern Med. 2008;148:370-378.


Review Date: 7/27/2014
Reviewed By: Joseph V. Campellone, MD, Department of Neurology, Cooper University Hospital, Camden, NJ. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.
The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
adam.com
 
2015 Spring Grief Seminar

Grief Seminars