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Interstitial lung disease

Definition

Interstitial lung disease is a group of lung disorders in which the deep lung tissues become inflamed and then damaged.

Alternative Names

Diffuse parenchymal lung disease; Alveolitis; Idiopathic pulmonary pneumonitis (IPP)

Causes

The lungs contain tiny air sacs (alveoli), which is where oxygen is absorbed. These air sacs expand with each breath.

The tissue around these air sacs is called the interstitium. In people with interstitial lung disease, this tissue becomes stiff or scarred, and the air sacs are not able to expand as much. As a result, not as much oxygen can get to the body.

Interstitial lung disease (ILD) can occur without a known cause. This is called idiopathic ILD. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is the most common disease of this type.

There are also dozens of known causes of ILD, including:

Cigarette smoking may increase the risk of developing some forms of ILD and may cause the disease to be more severe.

Symptoms

Shortness of breath is a main symptom of interstitial lung disease. You may breathe faster or need to take deep breaths:

Most people with this condition also have a dry cough. A dry cough means you do not cough up any mucus or sputum.

Over time, weight loss, muscle and joint pain, and fatigue are also present.

People with more advanced ILD may have:

Exams and Tests

The health care provider will perform a physical exam. Dry, crackling breath sounds may be heard when listening to the chest with a stethoscope.

The following tests may be done:

People who are heavily exposed to known causes of lung disease in the workplace are usually routinely screened for lung disease. These jobs include coal mining, sand blasting, and working on a ship.

Treatment

Treatment depends on the cause of the disease. Drugs that suppress the immune system and reduce swelling in the lungs are prescribed if an autoimmune disease is causing the problem. For persons who have the disease from unknown cause, there is no known effective therapy.

If there is no specific treatment for the condition, the aim is to make you more comfortable and support lung function:

Lung rehabilitation can provide support, and help you learn:

Some patients with advanced ILD may need a lung transplant.

Support Groups

You can ease the stress of illness by joining a support group. Sharing with others who have common experiences and problems can help you not feel alone.

Outlook (Prognosis)

The chance of recovering or of ILD getting worse depends on the cause and how severe the disease was when it was first diagnosed.

Some persons with ILD develop heart failure and high blood pressure in the blood vessels of their lungs.

Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis has a poor outlook.

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Call your health care provider if:

References

Behr J. Approach to the diagnosis of interstitial lung disease. Clin Chest Med. 2012;33:1-10.

Raghu G. Interstitial lung disease. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine. 24th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 92.

Selman M, Morrison LD, Noble PW, King TE. Idiopathic interstitial pneumonias. In: Mason RJ, Murray JF, Broaddus VC, et al., eds. Murray and Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine. 5th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Elsevier Saunders; 2010:chap 57.


Review Date: 2/8/2014
Reviewed By: Denis Hadjiliadis, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine, Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.
The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
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